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5 Breathtaking Walks Near Skipton

· Joseph Sheerin · Culture

This beautiful countryside near Skipton is great for walks.

White Crag on Rombalds Moor

Skipton is a walker’s wonderland, so we’ve rounded up five walks in and around this picturesque market town for you to try out…

Nestled on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, Skipton is the perfect starting point for your next walk. You’re never more than a few minutes away from the natural beauty of God’s Own County, with a range of woodland wanders, riverside rambles and moorland meanders to choose from. So next time you’re planning to go out for a walk, head to Skipton.

The Strid

The Strid

Credit: Heena Mistry licensed under Creative Commons

Bolton Priory has one of the best family-friendly walks you can do near Skipton. It’s 4.7-miles long and a 10-minute drive from town. You’ll follow the course of the River Wharfe through Strid Wood, which is filled with ancient oaks. Weave your way between the picturesque fields and looming trees until you reach the halfway point at Barden Bridge. Take a few minutes to appreciate the picturesque views in both directions before crossing to the other side to make your way back to the Priory.

Find out more about The Strid route. 

Silsden Moor Circular

Skipton Moor

Credit: Tim Green licensed under Creative Commons for commercial use.

If you fancy a challenging walk though God’s Own Country, head to Silsden Moor, just 15 minutes from Skipton. It’s an 11.5-mile trek along the Millennium Way – look into the distance as you ramble to see incredible views of Skipton, Rombald’s Moor and Ilkley. Along the way, you can explore local landmarks like Cowburn Beck and Low Bradley Mill. Your calves will burn on your way to the rocky outcrops of High Bradley, right on the edge of Skipton Moor, but you’ll be rewarded with rolling heather-covered hills and Chelker Reservoir below.

Find out more about The Silsden Moor Circular route

Embsay Moor Circular

Embsay Crag

Credit: a< href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/dphodgson/">David Hodgson licensed under Creative Commons for commercial use.

Embsay Moor is just 10 minutes from Skipton. This 9.6-mile trek shows off the natural beauty of the Yorkshire Dales National Park at its best. You’ll start on Barden Road and head east to Embsay Moor Reservoir, the first of three reservoirs you’ll encounter on this walk. This is a walk for experienced ramblers, so expect big climbs up Cracoe Fell, Rylstone Fell and Hall Fell as you pass landmarks like Rylstone Cross and Cracoe War Memorial. The moorland can get boggy as you make your way to the end, but the sight of the Upper and Lower Barden Reservoirs will make it all worthwhile.

Find out more about the Embsay Moor circular route

Skipton Woods Walk

Pennine Cruisers of Skipton

If you’re looking for a family-friendly walk, why not take a 1.9-mile stroll around the woods near Skipton Castle? The route starts at the entrance of The Old Sawmill and takes you along riverside paths towards the Round Dam. Cross the bridge to the island in the middle of the water which is the perfect place to stop and admire the views before you head down Long Dam and back towards The Bailey where you can enjoy wonderful views across the valley. The path is lined with ancient woodlands, so it’s the perfect place to look for birds. You might even spot a kingfisher!

Find out more about the Skipton Woods Walk

Skipton to Malham

Janet's Foss

You can see two of North Yorkshire’s most picturesque towns at their best on this 12-mile walk. This route between Skipton and Malham promises big views, quaint villages and must-see landmarks, but it can be challenging. You’ll wander past the charming villages of Flasby and Hetton before you enjoy a stroll around Winterburn Reservoir. Pendle Hill will be visible in the distance on clear days as you join The Dales High Way to check out the awe-inspiring Gordale Scar and the intimate Janet’s Foss waterfall.

Find out more about the Skipton to Malham route

Cover image Credit: Tim Green licensed under Creative Commons for commercial use.